31 Aug

Don’t be Caught – Latest Phishing Scam

By Kimberly DorrisGraves’ Disease & Thyroid Foundation

with Karen JayneStardust Nonprofit Building Supplies

Phishing scams – in which criminals attempt to collect your personal data by sending fraudulent emails – are often easy to spot.  Misspelled words, poor grammar, and requests for sensitive information (such as password or account number) are all good indicators that an e-mail really isn’t from your bank, your gym, or your credit card company.

But would you be able to spot a scam if you received an official looking notice via regular mail at your place of business?  ONE member Stardust Non-Profit Building Supplies recently received an official looking document in the mail from “Compliance Filing Service”.  The form stated that Arizona law required that the completed form – along with a $150 filing fee – be sent to an address on 24th Street in Phoenix.  The form referenced Arizona Revised Statutes 10-701 (which addresses annual meetings) and included a pre-filled section with the organization’s business address, as well as blank boxes asking for a listing of Board members and Officers.

A staffer at the Arizona Corporation Commission confirmed that the form is a scam and recommended contacting the state Attorney General’s Office.  The AG’s office stated that they are investigating the matter and recommended that any organization receiving this form file a complaint online at www.azag.gov or request a printed complaint form by calling 602-542-5763.

19 Jul

Closing 101

By: Christina Mencuccini, MBA MHA  – Susan G. Komen Arizona  (Closing July 31, 2017)

Out of all my MBA classes, I do not recall one discussion, assignment or even case study teaching me how to close a business gracefully. Analyzing failed brands and destitute business models led to a solid perspective and financial examination; but never once did we explore the complexity and complications that come with closing a business. Apparently, that class is only taught in real life.

I’ve experienced two closures in my lifetime, one as an impressionable teenager of our family business and the now, the second as a seasoned executive for one of the most meaningful causes in the country.

My father and his siblings closed our family business in the 1980’s. As the youngest of the cousins with a recent high school graduate, I was focused on anything but running a family supermarket chain and yet, the news was devastating to me. Mencuccini’s supermarkets were in business for nearly 70 years and were iconic for the many butchers, bakers, and others whose entire careers were lived out in the stores.

For me, the stores represented my first job and a huge part of my childhood identity.

My grandfather began this American Dream shortly after signing in at Ellis Island in 1911. When he passed away, I learned about the meaningful impact of our family business – stories of feeding people during the Depression, employing people with little or no education, supporting other local business, and generally being a cornerstone of community were revealed over and over. When I visit the town to this day, someone will recognize the name and tell me a story of their first job, a family member retiring, or a fond memory of my family.

Today I now know the importance of learning not only how to build a business, but how to close one as well. As we wind down #KomenAZ operations, I am moved by the many stories of survival and hope from people whose lives we have touched. I can appreciate the multi-generational impact our organization has made over the last 25 years.

There are no limits to the impact a business can make in one person’s life.

Two articles in the Harvard Business ReviewClosing a Business Gracefully and Shutting Down your Business Gracefully render interesting points to consider if ever faced with the decision to end an operation. Still, I believe that closing a business is not best taught in a primer or a classroom, but only in life.

#ThankyouArizona http://thankyouarizona.com/   (ONE:  Site featuring lots of pertinent information and details on the closing process)  

ONE will miss long-time Member – Susan G. Komen Arizona

03 Apr

Recipients of ONE’s 15th ‘Director of the Year’ Awards

Each year the awards seek to recognize nonprofit CEOs/Executive Directors who are outstanding examples of certain principles ONE values as representations of excellence in the management and leadership of nonprofit organizations in Maricopa County, Arizona.

This year’s award recipients are:

Karen Jayne,  CEO – Stardust Non-Profit Building Supplies, Mesa, AZ

Community Partnership Award

Envisioning a future without waste, Karen helped to create, and became the driving force behind, the Re:use Market Partnership.  Within just a few years, this collaborative model expanded to include eight nonprofits.  Everyone benefits, including the environment, as unrestricted funding is generated for the partner organizations who leverage the thrift store concept without having the risk and responsibility of running a retail store.

 

Doug Carter, CEO – UPWARD for children and families, Phoenix, AZ

Organizational Accomplishment and Innovation Award

Doug immediately began to craft a plan for recovery from the organization’s financial crisis he inherited as new CEO.  Through the ensuing uphill climb, he maintained a culture of cohesiveness by truly listening to and appreciating his team.  UPWARD now enjoys an amazing new facility enabling provision of services for even more kids and young adults thanks to his heart, strong positive leadership, and keen business acumen.

 

Joyce Millard Hoie, Executive Director – Raising Special Kids; Phoenix, AZ

Leader of Distinction Award

Parents know that Joyce listens and in turn clearly articulates the needs of their families as an effective advocate.  Building from strengths, she is committed to the power of parent leadership, training, mentoring and empowering parents as future leaders and advocates for the needs of their children.  She finds joy in translating needs into programs worthy of the funding she tenaciously seeks and secures in order to meet ever growing needs.

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Awards, consisting of original custom artwork, were presented to these winners by ONE President Aimee Runyon and Event Sponsor Dr. Susan Kenny Stevens of the Nonprofit Lifecycles Institute, with the assistance of Joe Dana of 12 News as Master of Ceremonies.  The awards were presented on the occasion of ONE’s annual Nonprofit Leader Day held on Wednesday, March 29th at the Desert Willow Conference Center following a keynote address by Susan M. Pepin, M.D. of the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust.

Photo credit:  Ben Arnold of Ben Arnold Photography